June 22, 2017

Top 10 reasons to use Solid State Drives?

Solid State Drives, SSD

Solid State Drives, SSD

Should you spend lots of money on Solid State Drives?

If you’ve heard much about computer hardware, then you’ve probably heard about SSDs. Solid state drives (SSDs) use flash memory to deliver dramatic performance gains compared to mechanical hard drives. Since SSDs don’t have small moving parts that are prone to failure, they offer a wide range of cost-effective benefits to nearly every computer user. On Facebook, we asked our fans to help us compile a list of the top 10 reasons to get an SSD. Here’s what they said.Before you buy an SSD, decide if it’s going to replace your current hard drive,  or if you’ll keep both the old and new drives, letting the Solid State Drive supplement the spinning platters. If you’re supplementing, you can get away with a smaller SSD and therefore save money. (As I write this, $60 can buy you a 120GB SSD or a 2TB hard drive.)

But supplementing the drive may not be practical. If you have a spare drive bay in your PC—common in desktops but rare in laptops—you can easily supplement. But if your Desktop has space for only one hard drive, replacing the drive will likely make more sense.

Have a tech question? Frank Alegre @ 305-710-3960

If you’re supplementing, you need only an SSD large enough to contain Windows, your installed programs, and maybe a handful of commonly-used documents.  Everything else should remain on the spinning hard drive.

Yes, the hard drive will slow down the PC when compared to one with only an SSD, but not by much. Since all of the files you’re regularly using are on the SSD, the performance hit will often be non-existent and rarely noticeable.

My test computer (a homemade desktop with a lot of bays) has a 120GB SSD. It has Windows 7 Ultimate installed, along with a huge number of programs (I use this computer to test software), and 14.2GB of documents, songs, and photos in the libraries. And that doesn’t quite fill up two thirds of the drive.

If you don’t have a spare bay, replacing your hard drive with an SSD makes a lot more sense—even though that means buying a larger, and therefore more expensive drive.

How large should you go?

The obvious answer: At least as large as your current hard drive. But that could be too expensive, take a good look at your current drive drive. Is it half full? If so, consider a smaller drive, although choose one that’s still large enough for reasonable growth.

If that’s no cost effective enough,  then,you can still use a smaller, supplemental SSD. After you remove your HD, put it in a USB enclosure, which effectively turns it into an external hard drive. And keep that external drive plugged into your PC, so you can access files that didn’t fit on the SSD.

But there are two problems with this approach: First, the external drive will make the laptop a little less portable. And second, access to files on the external drive will be considerably slower, especially if your laptop lacks a USB 3.0 port.

The top 10 reasons to get  Solid State Drives (SSD)

If you’ve heard much about computer hardware, then you’ve probably heard about SSDs. Solid state drives (SSDs) use flash memory to deliver dramatic performance gains compared to mechanical hard drives. Since SSDs don’t have small moving parts that are prone to failure, they offer a wide range of cost-effective benefits to nearly every computer user. On Facebook, we asked our fans to help us compile a list of the top 10 reasons to get an SSD. Here’s what they said.

 

        #1: Faster everything.

  • “Faster boots and faster program loads compared to a hard drive.” — Hiren P.

    Imagine clicking on a program and having it load immediately. That’s the power of an SSD. SSDs also enable “instant on” performance — the ability for your system to boot almost immediately. Since SSDs don’t have to mechanically seek out data on a moving platter (as a hard drive does), they help your system achieve instant-on performance.

    #2: Seamless multitasking.

    “Faster backups, faster antivirus full system scans, faster everything!” — Ruben F.

    The improved data access capabilities of an SSD allow you to toggle multiple programs with ease. From backing up your data to running antivirus system scans to accessing apps, websites and playlists, an SSD enables you to multitask like a pro — with little to no lag time.

    #3: Increased energy efficiency.

    “Lower energy consumption.” — Jason C.

    Since SSDs don’t have small moving parts, they require less energy to operate and can increase the life of your laptop’s battery.

    #4: Better system cooling.

    “Low temperatures when in use.” — Leon C.

    Since SSDs access data using flash memory rather than seeking it out on a spinning platter like a hard drive, they’re able to maintain more consistent operating temperatures, which can help keep overall system temps down.

    #5: Less fan noise.

    “No noise, [and they] run cooler as no moving parts to generate heat.” — Joe B.

    Since SSDs stay cooler than hard drives, your fan doesn’t have to work as hard, which means less fan noise and quieter overall performance. That humming sound you heard when using a hard drive? Gone.

    #6: Increased durability and reliability.

    “Higher survival rates after a drop/accident … that alone is priceless. Anyone who has ever had to do data recovery knows what I’m talking about.” — Lisa C.

    Since SSDs don’t have small moving parts that are easily susceptible to damage, they can be thrown around and still retain your important files and information. Designed to reliably store your data for years, SSDs offer additional shock and vibration resistance for travel-tested durability.

    #7: Flexible storage.

    “You can use them like a flash drive if you have a hot swap bay or dock.” — Nicholaus R.

    SSDs are available in multiple form factors, and some form factors (like mSATA) are able to plug directly into your system’s motherboard, allowing the drive to act as a cache drive or to work alongside your existing hard drive. What’s more, with a USB cable, you can use an SSD like a giant flash drive — just plug it in!

  • #8: Better gaming.

    “Faster load times in games so you are the first to load into a battlefield.” — Travis D.

    For gamers, the faster data access speeds of an SSD help enable faster load times, so you can spend more time playing and less time waiting. Many gamers love using SSDs because it means they’re a step (or a load) ahead of the competition, giving them an increased chance at first strikes and a more seamless gaming experience.

  • #9: Easy installation.

    “Waiting is overrated.”

    With our step-by-step videos and install guides, installing an SSD couldn’t get any easier — no computer skills necessary! Just grab a screwdriver, your system’s owner’s manual, and one of our Easy Install Kits and we’ll walk you through the process.

  • #10: More time for what matters.

    “To me, it’s pretty simple: the main reason to get an SSD is to save time. Be it booting up, loading applications, general OS responsiveness or intensive operations, a good SSD will save you time so you can focus on what matters.” — Jesse P.

    Since computers are used to accomplish a wide variety of personal and professional tasks, the increased speed and efficiency of an SSD means that you’ll have the ability to get more done in less time. Life moves fast — your computer should too.

 

 

Share and Enjoy

  • Facebook
  • Twitter
  • Delicious
  • LinkedIn
  • StumbleUpon
  • Add to favorites
  • Email
  • RSS

Windows 10 Installation Specs

Windows 10 Specs

Windows 10 Specs

The days of Windows being a system hog are gone forever.

So modest are the requirements for Windows 10 specs, you may be able to run it on machines that shipped with Windows Vista eight years ago.

But just how low can Windows 10 go when it comes to Computer specs? Since Microsoft released the OS for testing last year people have been loading Windows 10 on hardware dating back to 2003 – eons ago on the PC refresh timescale.

Here are the low-end and long-in-the-tooth machines that proved capable of running Windows 10.

Netbooks

Given the abundance of cheap Intel Atom-based netbooks out there, there’s a good deal of interest in whether these budget mini-laptops have the chops to handle Windows 10. Interestingly, they do seem to be in with a good shot.

This forum users reports Windows 10 as being “relatively fast” on a HP Mini 110 netbook with a 32-bit 1.66GHz Intel Atom N280 processor and 1GB of memory – comparing the speed to that of the machine running Windows XP. Their success should bode well for other users, given the Mini’s specs are similar to many other popular 10-inch netbooks, including: the ASUS Eee PC 1000HE, the Toshiba Mini NB205-N325BL and the Lenovo IdeaPad S10-2.

Windows 10 Specs Minimum Requirement

  • Processor: 1 gigahertz (GHz) or faster
  • RAM: 1 gigabyte (GB) (32-bit) or 2 GB (64-bit)
  • Free hard disk space: 16 GB
  • Graphics card: Microsoft DirectX 9 graphics device with WDDM driver
  • A Microsoft account and Internet access

Caveats

Beyond the speed of processor, you will also need a 32-bit or 64-bit CPU that supports three different processor features – PAE, SSE2 and NX. Windows 8.1 also requires support for these, so if your machine runs Windows 8.1, chances are it’ll run Windows 10.

If you’re running Windows 7, you can download the Windows 8/8.1 Upgrade Assistantto see if your hardware is up to spec or use theCPU-Z utility to check if your processor supports these features.

Also, the Windows Insider Programme, which will continue after the OS’ official release on July 29th, allows anyone to download a Windows 10 build for free to see how it will run on their machine.

Another top selling netbook reportedly capable of running Windows 10 is the Acer Aspire One – model KAV10, upgraded to 2GB – albeit with lag in some apps.

You should expect slowdown on these machines, however, as even with the recommended RAM for 32-bit systems, the HP Mini 110 reportedly started to chug when switching between running applications using Windows 10’s task view.

Drop below the recommended memory, 1GB on a 32-bit system and 2GB on a 64-bit system, and you can expect to struggle. A test of an early build of Windows 10 found that a 64-bit system with 512MB of RAM took more than 18 minutes to boot and was too sluggish to use comfortably.

Another gotcha that seems to have caught some netbook users of Windows 10 is the screen resolution. Some Windows Store apps will refuse to run on the devices with low resolutions – such as the original HP Mini 110’s 1024 x 576 display. However Windows 10 does support the 1024 x 600 displays found on many netbooks.

Overall there are indications that netbooks based on the Intel Atom N280 platform work better than those using the slightly slower Atom N270.

Basic tablets

If the Microsoft Surface is too expensive for you, then some of the mass market Windows tablets to come out in recent years, such as the Toshiba Encore and Dell Venue, will also reportedly run Windows 10 well, following a few driver tweaks.

Machines from the Windows XP era

Even 12-year-old hardware that meets the minimum specs can be coaxed into running Windows 10, like a desktop packing a 2003 AMD Athlon 64 3200+ processor, an Asus motherboard with onboard graphics and four DDR 256MB memory modules. But while the machine reportedly could handle smooth cursor movements it wasn’t exactly usable, taking 41 seconds to open a folder.

How long will the specs stay this low?

The more modest requirements of Windows 10 compared to its forebears may, in part, stem from Microsoft’s efforts to optimise core parts of the OS to run on ARM-based tablets and phones.

But how will Windows 10’s minimum specs change over time? Microsoft won’t be replacing Windows 10 with Windows 11 but will instead gradually upgrade Windows 10 – adding new features via regular updates.

There has been speculation over how rapidly Windows 10 will become more demanding to run as it accrues new features and how soon those running it on machines close to the minimum specs will be forced to upgrade.

Ian Moulster, Windows product manager, said Microsoft’s ambition is for the OS to continue to run on as many machines as possible – pointing to the broad base of older machines that can run Windows 10 today.

“The spec requirements even from Windows 7, which was released six years ago, haven’t changed much up to Windows 10, so it’s not as if it’s been getting significantly bigger [over time]. If you’ve got a Windows 7 machine now it’s very likely that it will run Windows 10, and that’s had six years of changes.”

Share and Enjoy

  • Facebook
  • Twitter
  • Delicious
  • LinkedIn
  • StumbleUpon
  • Add to favorites
  • Email
  • RSS

Windows 8 Password Reset

Windows 8 Reset Password

Windows 8 Reset Password

Do You Really Need to Spend $ in a Windows 8

Password Reset Tool?

  1.  In Windows 8, all of the important diagnostic and repair options available to you can be found on the Advance Startup Options (ASO) menu. Advanced Startup Options (ASO) is a centralized menu of recovery, repair, and troubleshooting tools in Windows 8. The ASO menu is also referred to as the Boot Options menu.Advanced Startup Options replaced the System Recovery Option menu available in Windows 7 and Windows Vista. Some sources still refer to Windows 8’s Advanced Startup Options menu as System Recovery Options. The tools available from the Advanced Startup Options menu can be used to run almost all of the repair, refresh, Windows 8 password reset, and diagnostic tools available in Windows 8 even if Windows won’t start.

Accessing The ASO for Windows 8 Password Reset

Note:  There are several ways to access the ASO menu,  but some (Methods 1, 2, & 3) are only available if you can already get in to Windows 8, or know your password. I recommend following Method # 4, which requires that you have a Windows 8 setup disc or flash drive, or Method # 5, which requires that you have, or create, a Windows 8 Recovery Drive. Method 6 , if your computer supports it.

  1. Click on Troubleshoot, then Advanced options, and finally Command Prompt.
  2. type the following command:

copy c:\windows\system32\utilman.exe c:\

…and then press Enter. You should see a 1 file(s) copied confirmation.

  1. Next, type this command  again followed by Enter:

copy c:\windows\system32\cmd.exe c:\windows\system32\utilman.exe

Answer with Y or Yes to question about the overwrite of the utilman.exe file. You should now see another file copy confirmation.

  1. Remove any flash drives or discs that you may have in cd-rom drive, and then restart your computer.
  2. Once you see  the Windows 8 logon screen , click the Ease of Access icon at the bottom-left corner of the screen. Command Prompt should now open What Command Prompt? That’s right! The changes you made in Step 3 & 4 above replaced the Ease of Access tools with Command Prompt (don’t worry, you’ll reverse these changes in Step 11). Now that you have access to a command line, you can reset your Windows 8 password.
  3. Next you need to execute the net user command  as shown below, replacing myusername with your user name, and mynewpassword with the password you’d like to begin using:

net user myusername mynewpassword

For example, on my computer, I would execute the command like this:

net user “Frank Alegre” a@vdrkrosxir4lude

Note: You only need to use double quotes around your username if it happens to have a space in it.

Tip: If you get a The user name could not be found message, execute net user to see the list of Windows 8 users on the  computer for reference and then try again with a valid username. A System error 8646 / The system is not authoritative for the specified account…message indicates that you’re using a Microsoft account to login to Windows 8, not a local account.

  1.  Now, Close Command Prompt.
  2. Login with the new password you set in Step 7!
  3. Now that your Windows 8 password has been reset and you’re back in, either create a Windows 8 password reset disk or switch your local account to a Microsoft account. No matter which you choose, you’ll finally have legitimate, and much easier to use, Windows 8 password reset options.
  4. Finally, you should reverse the hack that makes this password reset trick work in Windows 8. To do that, repeat Steps 1 & 2 above. Once Command Prompt is open again, execute this command:

copy c:\utilman.exe c:\windows\system32\utilman.exe

Confirm the overwriting by answering Yes and then restart your computer.

I hope this tutorial was able to help with Windows 8 Password Reset Issues.

See us on  Google, Facebook, Twitter  or call us @ 305-710-3960 for advise on your Computer Repair Issues.

Share and Enjoy

  • Facebook
  • Twitter
  • Delicious
  • LinkedIn
  • StumbleUpon
  • Add to favorites
  • Email
  • RSS

Alcatel OmniSwitch 6850-48X Information

Alcatel

OmniSwitch 6850-48X Information

The difference between a GUI and a CLI is that GUI refers to Graphical User Interface while CLI refers to Command Line Interface. GUI is a type of user interface that allows users to interact with electronic devices with images rather than text commands. CLI is a mechanism for interacting with a computer operating system or software by typing commands to perform specific tasks.

Below you may find links with references about user Guide and CLI  for the OmniSwitch  6850-48x switch models

GUI

OmniSwitch 6850-48X

Alcatel Switch

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

The Graphical User Interface or GUI in the Alcatel Switch is very user friendly

This OmniSwitch 6800/6850/9000 Switch Management Guide describes basic attributes of your switch and
basic switch administration tasks. The software features described in this manual are shipped standard with
your OmniSwitch 6800 Series, OmniSwitch 6850 Series, and OmniSwitch 9000 Series switches. These
features are used when readying a switch for integration into a live network environment.

CLICK HERE FOR GUIDE, OR WHITE PAPERS

OmniSwitch 6850-48X CLI Guide

OmniSwitch 6850-48X CLI Guide

Click hereFor More Inf on OmniSwitch CLI Reference Guide

 

 

Share and Enjoy

  • Facebook
  • Twitter
  • Delicious
  • LinkedIn
  • StumbleUpon
  • Add to favorites
  • Email
  • RSS

XML Sitemap